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The legal profession is rated as having the second most sleep deprived professionals with an average of 7 hours sleep a night. This was only 2 minutes less than the medical profession who had an average of 7 hours and 2 minutes. Is this true in for every country?

Researchers analysed data from interviews with 27,157 adults as part of the annual US National Health Interview Survey, conducted by a division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to arrive at the results. The research was to determine which occupations, on average, produce workers who sleep the least and the most. The rankings were based on two variables: 1) average hours of sleep that respondents said they got in a 24-hour period, and 2) respondents’ occupations, as they would be classified by the Department of Labor.

Whether sleep deprived in the legal profession, the medical professional or being a corporate executive, professionals are hoodwinked to believe that they are hero’s and wear their sleep-deprivation as a badge of honour. What all do not know is the impact on one’s health, relationships and overall productivity. The survey found that even people in the least sleep-deprived professions averaged less than 7.5 hours of sleep per night. Depending on one’s own mechanics and requirement for well rested sleep, this could range between 7 and 9 hours.

Various studies in sleep deprivation have found the following:

  • A Russian study found that nearly 63 percent of men who suffered a heart attack also had a sleep disorder. Men who had a sleep disorder had a risk of heart attack that was 2 to 2.6 times higher and a risk of stroke that was 1.5 to 4 times higher.
  • In a study by the Mayo Clinic, sleep-restricted subjects gained more weight than their well-rested counterparts over the course of a week, consuming an average of 559 extra calories a day.
  • The body’s manufacture of proteins to sexual arousal including orgasm, is influenced by REM sleep
  • Weakening of our immune system, sleep deprivation also makes one more susceptible to garden-variety illnesses, like the common cold.
  • Impair cognitive processes such as alertness, concentration, problem-solving and memory.
  • Increase the risk of diabetes.
  • Contribute to depression. One 2007 study found people with insomnia were five times more likely to develop the condition as those who slept soundly.
  • Impact on longevity while speeding up ageing.

Sleep deprivation in any form can cause a wide range of mental impairments related to focus. This means trouble for a variety of detail-oriented tasks, from written and oral communication to editing and proofreading to analytical thinking. Continuing to accumulate sleep deficits , will lead to burn out.

Lawyers, advocates and those in work environments where time is a constraint to getting optimal sleep, could consider implementing napping pods as a line of defence to on the job sleepiness. Although napping pods can also treat sleep deprivation in a symptomatic way, sleep-deprived professionals are discovering that napping is way better than nodding off. We point out to not confuse napping with nodding off.

Napping is a proactive and preventative way to improve productivity for the day. Napping begins when you take a break to revive yourself in a napping pod like some of the most progressive companies in the world. .In the legal fraternity, US based legal firm White and Case have been a first to implement napping pods in their Washingston office.

To improve your sleep, consider taking our sleep assessment (Sleep Quality Surveyand email it to fatigueassesment@infiniterisk.com where your results will be made available. The first step to assessing sleep quality is to determine the possible causes via a non-invasive sleep assessment conducted in the comfort of your own home and under normal sleeping conditions. From this assessment you would be in a position to delve further or have the answer to what could be upsetting either the quantity and or quality of your sleep.[/fusion_text][one_half last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][/one_half][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][/one_third][one_full last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][/one_full]

Peter Šmanjak

Owner and Founder at Infinite Risk

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